Lucky Man Presents

Tiger Army, Twin Temple, Lara Hope & THe Ark-Tones

Events

Mar 21 Sat
Tiger Army, Twin Temple, Lara Hope & THe Ark-Tones8:00 PM | Doors: 6:30 PM
Marquee Theatre
All Ages

THIS SHOW IS GENERAL ADMISSION. NO SEATS ON THE MAIN FLOOR. STANDING ROOM ONLY. LIMITED SEATING AVAILABLE IN BALCONY.  BALCONY IS FOR PATRONS 21 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER WITH PROPER ID.  BALCONY SEAT TICKET MUST BE PURCHASED FOR SEATING.

NO REFUNDS/ EXCHANGES UNLESS HEADLINER CANCELS.

ALL TICKET SALES ARE SUBJECT TO SERVICE FEES.

PARKING IN THE MARQUEE LOTS IS AN ADDITIONAL $10.00 PER SPACE USED. CASH ONLY AND PAID TO THE PARKING ATTENDANTS NIGHT OF THE EVENT.

Tiger Army

Due out Sept. 13, 2019, ‘Retrofuture’ is the bands’ sixth full-length (their second on Luna-tone / Rise Records) – it arrives a full two decades after their first album. 
 
Produced by Ted Hutt (The Gaslight Anthem, Old Crow Medicine Show, Lucero), the LP’s concept is elaborated on by frontman Nick 13: “Retrofuturism is generally a visual aesthetic, but it got me thinking, it’s the perfect description for our sound!  The gear and instruments are mostly 1950s and 60s, but while the tones may be classic, we’ve always tried to push into uncharted territory musically with each release.  So the idea behind this record was to create our version of what someone might imagine future rock ’n’ roll sounding like, but from the perspective of the mid-20th century.”
 
          Brimming with vintage fuzz, tape echo and reverb, the album’s thirteen tracks weave stylistically through vintage punk, garage and rock ’n’ roll, while still maintaining a curious modernity as influences from Latin music to surf shoot through like satellites in the night sky.  Present as always are the band’s signature melodicism and 13’s ethereal vocals.
 
          The band will embark on the “Retrofuture Tour” in September, with dates through the end of 2019 taking them across the United States, Canada, Europe, UK and Mexico.  Fellow Angelenos, SadGirl will support in the States, with Finnish post-punks, Grave Pleasures supporting in Europe and the UK.
 
‘Retrofuture’ follows last summer’s ‘Dark Paradise’ EP, the title track being the trio’s take on the Lana Del Rey song.  The EP drew on mid-century surf and exotica music, while the visuals reflected a love of Tiki subculture.  The single received airplay on KROQ in Los Angeles and various specialty radio stations around the country.  The release was supported solely by two sold out shows at The Theatre at Ace Hotel in Los Angeles, as the rest of the year was reserved for writing what would become the new LP.
 
Tiger Army started in 1996 in Berkeley, California – playing their first show at seminal DIY venue 924 Gilman.  A trio with electric guitar, stand-up bass and drums led by singer, guitarist and songwriter Nick 13, the band’s sound is a unique blend of punk and mid-century rock 'n' roll, with an emphasis on songwriting and melody.  The band has called Los Angeles home for the majority of its existence, since 2000.  Their live sets have to be experienced, taking the audience on a journey from high-impact stompers to atmospheric ballads, drawing as much at times on Monument-era Roy Orbison as The Ramones.
 
Tiger Army’s first four records were released on Hellcat / Epitaph Records, starting with their self-titled debut in 1999.  Heavy touring began shortly after and continued through the end of 2008, when the band wrapped up the worldwide cycle for their fourth record, ‘Music From Regions Beyond’, produced by the legendary Jerry Finn.  Throughout the years, they shared stages with notable artists like Morrissey and Social Distortion.  While the album yielded the single “Forever Fades Away” and saw their highest visibility with favorable reviews in publications like the ‘New York Times’ and national TV appearances such as ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’, they’ve always been outsiders to the mainstream, with authenticity the only priority.
 
The band’s adherents are closer to members of a movement than fans, with hundreds of tattoos existing related to Tiger Army's lyrics, song titles or signature "Tigerbat" logo.  The number of these is more likely in the thousands, and lest one think that’s hyperbole – it isn’t.
 
In 2009, Tiger Army slowed down as Nick 13 embarked on a solo career playing Americana music, releasing and touring a self-titled album on Sugar Hill Records in 2011.  Perhaps unexpected to those who hadn’t paid close attention to the roots music underpinnings of the band’s sound, the frontman played festivals such as Stagecoach and Austin City Limits, while his videos were played on country music video stations like CMT and GAC.  Tiger Army played only a few gigs a year during this period, including “Octoberflame”, a multi-night SoCal festival curated by 13 that had its ninth year in 2017.
 
After spending years searching for the next creative evolution in the band’s sound, 13 found inspiration in early 60s American and British rock ’n’ roll – the transitional and experimental period after the genre’s first wave, but before the new decade became musically codified.  The era spoke to 13’s “what’s next” sensibility and in 2015 Tiger Army recorded the album that would become ‘V •••–‘ (Rise / Luna-tone), beginning a tour cycle with its release the following year that lasted twenty-two months; taking them all over North America, Europe and Australia – which included headlining shows, as well as doing select dates with Frank Turner, a co-headlining run with Murder By Death and performing on two episodes of NBC’s ‘Last Call with Carson Daly’.  The cycle also saw the band embark on their first-ever South American tour, where audiences reached a fever pitch for songs like the Spanish language “Hechizo de Amor”.
READ MORE +

Twin Temple

Everybody knows that the Devil has all the best tunes. From Robert Johnson selling his soul at the crossroads to the blood-soaked black metal of Norway, Satan has long loomed large over the music world, striking fear into the hearts of the sanctimonious. But nothing that has gone before will prepare you for the arrival of Twin Temple: Los Angeles’ one and only purveyors of Satanic Doo-Wop. Devout Satanists and meticulous preservers of rock’n’roll’s ancient, timeless spirit, this black-clad and effortlessly stylish duo have created a sound that blends their Satanic ideology with the irresistible sass and melody of classic ‘50s and ‘60s rock ‘n’roll. The result is Twin Temple (Bring You Their Signature Sound…Satanic Doo-Wop), a debut album that not only serves to salute the Dark One, but also delivers some of the catchiest and coolest music to emerge from any genre in years.
 
“It’s really just a reflection of everything we love,” explains vocalist Alexandra James. “We’ve always loved rock ‘n’ roll, especially from the golden era of American music, but we’re also Satanists and study the Occult. We both practice magick. It was just a crazy idea– ‘Why can’t you love Roy Orbison and hail Satan at the same time?’ Satanism has been relegated to the metal scene for so long, but we are Satanists and listen to The Platters and Buddy Holly, you know? We love metal too, but this is a reflection of who we are as people. This record was something we wanted to create for ourselves… we were happy to see that it resonated with other people out there, too.”
 
 Originally released independently by the band and limited to a suitably malevolent 666 vinyl copies & given a full release on Rise Above in Spring 2019, Twin Temple’s debut is so beautifully conceived and executed that it sounds like a long, lost classic from the ‘60s, unearthed in some dusty studio vault. With Alexandra’s soulful but siren-like voice and partner Zachary James’ dazzling, authentic arrangements, songs like The Devil (Didn’t Make Me Do It) and I’m Wicked pledge their allegiance to Satan in the most bizarrely accessible and infectious of ways. Bolstered by plenty of analogue hiss and a devotion to old school recording techniques, it’s an album that brings the band’s unique and enlightened take on Satanism to vivid, vital life.
 
“Something we’re sick of is all the overproduced records,” says Alexandra. “It just takes the soul out of music. With this record, we wanted to get rid of all of that. We looked at how all our heroes made records in the ‘50s and ‘60s. They weren’t even mixing in stereo back then, so that’s why we made the record in mono. We did everything, including the vocals, live to tape. We went in the studio, played the songs two or three times and chose the best takes. The whole record was done in a day and a half. It has a rawness to it because we wanted to capture the human element, instead of overproducing everything. Perfect is boring.”
 
With a Satanic philosophy that prizes individualism, respect, equality and defiance, Twin Temple are intuitively in tune with rock’n’roll’s integral outcast culture, even if the fiendishly seditious sound of Alexandra singing enticingly about Sex Magick may make more than few music critics and unsuspecting punters spit their coffee across the room. Ultimately, this transgressive act of musical mischief is as subversive as it gets in this age of societal division, insidious ignorance and empty hostility.
 
“To us, there is a connection between Satanism and rock ’n’ roll – they’re both very much defined by transgression, rejection of societal norms and a fierce sense of individualism and outsider culture,” Alexandra avows. “Historically, American rock ’n’ roll played an integral role in social justice and equality. In the face of racist Jim Crow laws of the south & segregation, you had black and white teenagers dancing together at the Frankie Lymon shows. This was about social change, about breaking down boundaries and all oppressive norms of the old guard. In our minds, vintage rock’n’roll, doo-wop and Satanism go hand in hand. But at the same time, we recognize that it’s not the most likely of pairings!”
 
It seems the Devil’s best tunes are in safe hands. Hail Twin Temple. Hail Satan!
READ MORE +